Yale Study: Moms Who Can’t Afford Diapers Are More Likely To Be Depressed

Low-income mothers in New Haven who can’t afford enough diapers to keep their babies clean and dry are more likely to report trouble coping with stress, depression or trauma, according to a study published today in the journal Pediatrics. The survey of 877 New Haven mothers found that nearly 30 percent said they didn’t have enough diapers to change their children as often as they would like, and the problem was more common among Hispanic women and caregivers over age 45, usually grandmothers. Women who reported diaper need were nearly twice as likely to experience mental health issues, although the nature of the link is unclear. The authors hypothesize that the link could be direct, or it could be part of more complex interaction between mental health and poverty. “It could be that moms who have more mental health difficulties have trouble obtaining diapers,” said the lead author, Megan Smith, an assistant professor of psychiatry, child study and public health at Yale University.

When Interns Snooze, Do Patients Lose?

For the second time in eight years, the organization that regulates graduate medical education has limited the number of hours interns and residents may work at a time.

Yale Med Students, Faculty Courted By Army

Military officers in dress uniform and Army Reserve medics in camouflage fatigues mingled with academics from Yale University Wednesday in an attempt to encourage Yale students and medical staff to consider working as Army medics and to publicize the Army’s humanitarian work.

Vet Groups Want Answers To ‘Wrongful’ Discharges

While the number of veterans discharged for “personality disorder” has dropped dramatically in the last two years, the numbers of service members diagnosed with adjustment disorder has climbed, leading veterans’ groups to charge Wednesday that the military may be playing a shell game to deny benefits to combat veterans.