Work by High School Campers

Stories From Our School Workshops

Zoom Disruptions On Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration, Will They Continue Or Changed?

During its Hispanic Heritage Month celebration, Common Ground High School’s Zoom meeting was disrupted by student trolling. To gain insight into the disruption, the Journalism Class at Common Ground interviewed Sharyn  Lopez, the high school’s student engagement and out of school activity manager. “[Distance Learning] requires us to be our best selves, and this [meeting] was not a moment when we were our best selves,” Lopez said. “The focus was taken away. It became centered on the [disruptors] sense of entitlement.’’

Lopez described what happened on Oct.

Hispanic Heritage Zoom Assembly Disrupted

A virtual celebration for Hispanic Heritage Month was disrupted with a series of chats and music blaring as presenters attempted to speak. From the start the chat, which was for answering questions, sharing information and providing a vehicle for students’ feedback, took an ugly turn. Users sent a series of smiley faces, and before long lots of spam chats including some with profanity were showing up on the Zoom screen – a distraction for everyone in attendance for the celebration. The chat function was disabled. But once the chat was disabled, another issue occurred.

How The Pandemic Has Changed Our Entertainment Experience

Since the spread of the coronavirus across Connecticut and the country, many businesses have shut down, then partially reopened including most of the entertainment industry. From concerts, movie theaters, film sets and more, people have decided to stay home and are now relying on the convenience of entertainment online, using at-home technology such as smartphones, laptops, TVs, and more. Total internet hits have soared – between 50% and 70% – during the first months of the pandemic, according to news reports.  And about 80% of those aged 35 and younger are watching more streaming content than before the pandemic hit in March. “I would say that I watch movies a lot more,” Thomas Small, 17, of East Haven said. “I become almost indulged.

Video: UConn’s Dairy Bar A Great Place To Be

The University of Connecticut’s Dairy Bar opened in 1953 to sell dairy products made by the Creamery. The Creamery was established in the early 1900s and bottled milk until 1991. Today, the Creamery makes ice cream according to its original recipe and sells this ice cream at the Dairy Bar.  — Video by C-HIT campers Luis Mila, Ephemia Nicolakis and Kevin Barahona. Luis Mila is a student at Miami Lakes Education Center, Florida; Ephemia Nicolakis of Woodbridge is a student at Amity Regional High School and Kevin Barahoma is a student from Riobamba, Ecuador.

Students from Ecuador

Photo Gallery: International Students From Ecuador Explore Journalism In Connecticut

At its ninth annual week-long high school summer journalism workshop at the University of Connecticut, the Connecticut Health Investigative Team trained its first-ever group of international students – all of them from Riobamba, Ecuador. The five students – Christina Huisha, (18), Leslie Parra (17), Kevin Barahona (18), Mikaela Romo (16) and Mikaela De La Cruz (16) – had their trip sponsored by the Sister Cities International program. Riobamba is a sister city of Norwalk. Sister Cities International’s goal is to strengthen relationships around the globe based on cultural, educational, informational or trade exchanges. 

While at the summer journalism workshop on UConn’s main campus in Storrs, the other campers made them feel welcome. Brian Ruiz, Luis Mila and Danny Ruiz were three C-HIT students who helped translate and explain American customs so the students from Ecuador were never made to feel excluded.

College Students Turn To E-Communities For Mental Health Support

About 26% of young adults 18-25 years old have a mental health issue, but only 38% of those affected actually receive treatment, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Colleges across the U.S. have felt the weight of the statistics.  Counseling centers are flooded by an increasing demand for a limited amount of mental health resources, resulting in students getting placed on waitlists. At times, students are turning toward e-communities, particularly ones on Instagram, for support and recovery. Many accounts are dedicated to raising awareness and offering support for eating disorders, anxiety, and depression. Instagram users communicate and bond through their captions, stories, and private messages on their mental battles and physical struggles.

Video: A Look At Storrs Center

Located a short walk from the University of Connecticut, Storrs Center is a mixed-use town center that includes residences, restaurants, shops, businesses and educational, recreational, and cultural offerings. — Video package by Quentin Leahy, Danny Ruiz, Maeve Cox and Cristina Huisha

 

The video team: Maeve Cox attends Cheshire High School, Danny Ruiz attends John F. Kennedy High School, Waterbury; Cristina Huisha is a student from Riobamba, Educador and Quentin Leahy of Southington attends Conn. River Academy in East Hartford.

Corporal Punishment Still Practiced In Some States

Corporal punishment is practiced in 19 states, mostly in the south, and African American students are more likely to be disciplined with a type of physical punishment than whites, according to recent studies. On average, 160,000 students are disciplined by corporal punishment a year, reported the National Institutes of Health in its study of the prevalence of this form of discipline in 2016. Black children in Mississippi and Alabama are at least 51% more likely to be corporally punished than whites; and in one fifth of the states’ school districts, black children are over 5 times (500%) more likely to be corporally punished, the NIH reported. Corporal punishment is a discipline method in which a supervising adult purposely inflicts pain on a child in response to a child’s misbehavior. In schools where physical punishment is used, common tactics include, paddling, and spanking by hand or wooden stick.

UConn Teams Exceed NCAA Academic Requirements

The University of Connecticut’s football and men’s basketball and women’s basketball teams are among many teams at the university that have performed above the required NCAA Academic Progress Rate. The football and men’s basketball teams both have improved their APR scores in recent years. The women’s team has repeatedly scored well off the court while also winning national championships. The men’s basketball team earned an NCAA Public Recognition Award for posting a perfect 1000 single year APR score in the 2017-2018 year, UConn Today reported. The football team has had a steady improvement in the last five years in its multi-year APR score, with it starting at 960 in 2013-2014 and increasing to 981 for 2017-2018, according to The New Haven Register.