Two Nursing Homes Fined After Deaths, Four Others Cited

Six Connecticut nursing homes have been fined for violations, including two that resulted in resident deaths. The state Department of Public Health (DPH) has fined Madison House in Madison $2,265 for an incident in which a resident was found face-down and unresponsive in bed. The resident was admitted to the facility in November 2015, according to DPH, with a broken hip. The resident had surgery and subsequently went into cardiogenic shock five days later and required “extensive care,” according to the citation. The resident was found unresponsive Dec.

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Six Nursing Homes Fined Following Verbal Abuse, Lapses In Care

Six nursing homes have been fined by the state Department of Public Health in connection with cases of verbal abuse, a resident who was given morphine by mistake and a resident who broke a bone after jumping out of a window. On Aug. 12, Abbott Terrace Health Center in Waterbury was fined $1,300 in connection with the resident who was hospitalized with a compression fracture of the spine after making the jump, according to the DPH citation. The resident had been admitted on July 18 with pain in the feet, knees and hips from neuropathy that was described as “horrible or excruciating.” The home’s clinical record failed to reflect whether subsequent pain assessments were done or whether the prescribed painkiller, Toradol, was given, the citation states. On July 20, the resident was found outside crawling on the ground at 12:50 a.m., records show.

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Resident’s Abusive Behavior, Nurses’ Failure To Call 911, Result In Nursing Home Fines

Eight Connecticut nursing homes have been fined by the state Department of Public Health for incidents involving lapses in care, including a failure to call 911 when a resident was dying and a case in which one resident attacked another with a butter knife. On April 29, the Norwichtown Rehabilitation and Care Center was fined $1,160 in connection with a Feb. 23 incident in which 911 was not called when a resident with severe heart and kidney problems was found without vital signs, records show. CPR was performed for five minutes before an advanced practice registered nurse ordered it stopped because the person had died, but a registered nurse mistakenly told the APRN that it had gone on for 15 minutes, records show. A doctor at the home said that a longer CPR session would not have saved the resident, but the home was faulted for not ensuring that 911 was called, records show.

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