Med Board Fines Greenwich Doctor For Prescribing High Doses Of Opioids

The state Medical Examining Board fined a Greenwich doctor $3,000 on Tuesday for failing to justify prescribing high doses of opioids for patients in 2015 and 2016. The board also reprimanded the license of Dr. Francis X. Walsh, placed his license on probation for six months and ordered him to take courses in medical documentation and controlled substance prescribing, a consent order he agreed to said. In prescribing the drugs in his office practice, Walsh failed to properly document that he had examined the patients and failed to justify “potentially dangerous dosing and combinations of medications,” the order said. During the probation, Walsh must hire a doctor to review his office practice. Walsh has surrendered his state registration to prescribe controlled substances in that practice, state records show.

Half Of State Hospitals Exceed Infection Rates, New Data Show

State health inspectors visiting Stamford Hospital in late 2012 turned up several infection-control violations, including the improper drying and storage of endoscopes, instruments used to look inside the body. An inspection of Hartford Hospital in 2012 found an operating room with “dust and darkened debris” on top of pumps attached to IV poles, a container of syringes “overflowing” a protective cover, and brownish stains on the floor and underside of the operating table. These kinds of lapses, while not directly tied to patient infections, have contributed to Connecticut’s poor ratings on some federal measures of hospital-acquired infections. Newly released data show that more than 50 percent of the state’s hospitals had rates for at least one type of hospital-acquired infection that were worse than federal benchmarks, in late 2012 and 2013. No other state had a higher percentage of its hospitals exceeding the infection standards set by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and most states had fewer than 20 percent, according to the data, compiled by Kaiser Health News.

Delays Hamper State’s Doctor Discipline Process

When Said Nedlouf’s wife, Mary, was terminally ill with metastatic breast cancer in late 2006, Nedlouf was willing to do anything to save her.  He found Dr. Jarir Nakouzi in Bridgeport, a homeopathic doctor who said he could cure Mary’s cancer. During Nakouzi’s treatment of Mary, her husband racked up over $40,000 in charges.  The treatment — which involved a variety of pills and supplements and “bioresonance” therapy, a technique that measures electrical activity at the skin—failed. In early 2007, Mary passed away at the age of 42. When he sought Nakouzi’s help, Nedlouf’s wife was “in and out of consciousness,” he said in a recent interview. Desperate for a cure at the time, he “didn’t think much.