Work by High School Campers

Stories From Our School Workshops

Local Stores Thrive Despite Online Competition

In the past decade, online retailers have grown more and more popular, with some earning millions of dollars in revenue each year. Consumers can access products on the internet in a matter of seconds these days, whether it be through a computer, laptop, or mobile device. According to Tinuiti, a website that tracks online retail, 96% of American consumers shop online, but 65% of shopping is still done in stores. The gap between the percentage of online shoppers versus in-store shoppers is rapidly increasing, with millennials spending 67% of their spending budget on the internet. With said gap growing larger and larger, local businesses are slowly declining — but they’re not disappearing.

College Athletes And Mental Health

Jake Roberts of Danbury was highly recruited to run track in college. He decided to run track at the University of Connecticut, but during his freshman year, his plans took a wrong turn. He said he began to feel depressed, anxious and overwhelmed at having to perform well at both his meets and in the classroom. He said he “buckled under the pressure.”

After one year, he made a tough life decision and quit the track team to focus more on his journalism and political science studies. This is not a unique situation.

Tennis Surfaces Affect Injuries

The type of surface a tennis player plays on affects the chances and types of injury or lingering pain. Out of the three, hard court surface could cause the most damage to your body. “My personal experience has shown that hard courts are tough on the joints, just from the lack of give,” said Donna Doherty, the former editor in chief and vice president of Tennis Magazine. There are three main playing surfaces in tennis — clay, hard court, and grass. Clay courts are made from crushed brick.

Implications Of The $15 Minimum Wage In Connecticut

Jan Stone, who works at The Flower Pot in Storrs Center, said she is happy that she will see her pay increase thanks to a bill passed in May by the state legislature. That’s because Connecticut became the seventh state to pass a bill that would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour over the next four and a half years. “It’s good for me,” Stone, a Storrs resident who has worked at the shop for the past two years, said. Before the bill passed, it was debated for months at the State Capitol. For minimum wage workers across the state, earning a higher wage will bring a sense of financial relief.

Social Media’s Impact On Teen Health

One day Kamar Rhoden, 15, of Hartford, was scrolling through Instagram when he received a notification that someone had left him a comment. When Kamar clicked on the comment, he saw that it was mean, and he said he was immediately overwhelmed with sadness. Seeing that someone could say such mean things, he said he became depressed and wanted to change everything about himself. Kamar said he has since been able to overcome his sadness, that may not be the case for other teens. In fact, The Crime Report reported that an article in the Journal of School Violence has found that “Students who experienced bullying or cyberbullying are nearly two times more likely to attempt suicide.” Twenty percent of students, ages 12-18, were bullied during the 2016-2017 school year, TCR reports.

Vlog: A Day In The Life Of A C-HIT Camper

Wonder what it’s like to attend C-HIT’s summer journalism workshops? Here’s a look:

This Vlog was created by Marie Kane, a graduate of The Morgan School, Clinton and Leslie Parra, a high school student from Riobamba, Ecuador.

Football Injuries Prevalent In High School

Teenagers who play high school football are three times more likely to be injured than those in other sports, according to statistics. USA Football estimates there are 3,000,000 youth football players in the United States. Knee, ACL, shoulder and various other injuries are common, but concussions are the most common. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, 57% of high school football players suffer a concussion during practice — when most injuries occur. Alex Okun, 16, who plays for Wayne Valley in New Jersey, injured his shoulder in a 2018 game, although he too said most injuries occur during practice.

Ecuadorian Students Participate In C-HIT’s Multimedia Journalism Workshop

As part of the Norwalk-Riobamba Sister Cities program, five high school students from Ecuador were selected to receive scholarships to attend the Connecticut Health I-Team Multimedia Journalism Workshop at the University of Connecticut. The students were chosen out of 84 kids in Riobamba, Ecuador, based on their academic excellence and community engagement. Kevin Barahona, Mikaela de la Cruz, Cristina Huisha, Leslie Parra, and Mikaela Romo studied at UConn the week of July 14. They learned how to use the 5 Ws How and when writing a news story, how to take sharp photographs using natural light on their smart phones and to record, edit and produce a podcast and video stories. The students also had the opportunity to be immersed in the American culture and make new friends.

Students’ Reactions To School Safety Efforts Differ

School shootings have been a major concern in America since the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in 2012, in which 20-year-old Adam Lanza shot and killed 26 people, 20 children and six adults. Schools in America are now trying to make more of an effort to protect students and prevent events like this from happening. But for some kids, these efforts are not enough. Jaylynn Higgin, who attends Achievement First High School in Hartford, said, “I don’t think my school is prepared for [a school shooting]. They focus more on teaching students academics; they forget that we are humans too and we want to enjoy our lives and they don’t take the time to go over safety measures with the kids in case the teacher is not in the room when the incident happens.”

Students like Higgin are more concerned about what might happen in different situations if a school shooter is present in the school.

Teens Gain Experience With Help Of Journalism Pros

This year at the University of Connecticut, 22 teenagers, ages 16 and older, participated in the Conn. Health I-Team multimedia journalism workshop. They are receiving advice on investigative reporting, how to report and write new stories, and basic digital journalism, for example podcasting, shooting and editing videos with professional instructors. Since 2011, the Conn. Health I-Team has hosted high school journalism camps and close to 300 students.